About Friends of Lebanon

 

In July 2006 when the war on Lebanon exploded, the country had been on an upswing, a period of remission from the aggressions suffered during the 1978 and 1982 Israeli invasions. In 2000 Israel was finally forced out of Lebanon for what should have been forever. Lebanon was energetically rebuilding itself, reclaiming its former glory as the Switzerland of the Middle East.

The summer of 2006 did not bring the usual tourist trade. Instead it brought the Israeli war machine. There is no doubt that Israel deliberately crushed the infrastructure of Lebanon: electricity, fuel oil, airport, sea ports, roads, and bridges. Israel destroyed homes, offices, shops, farms, schools, hospitals. Israel deliberately targeted civilians in their homes, refugees fleeing their homes, ambulances, funerals, press personnel, UN personnel. Despite this whirlwind of destruction, however, the Lebanese stood firm in their resistance to Israeli aggression and occupation. Although the war machine has lumbered back home, violence and interference are menacingly ever present.

The history of Lebanon is complex. All the complexities in the world, however, can never justify the recent rampage against the Lebanese people. Nothing can justify over 960 strikes (for an estimated 4,000,000 cluster bombs dropped)—in the very hours of negotiating a ceasefire—intentionally leaving over 1,000,000 unexploded little bombs littering Lebanon, bombs that will long continue to explode. Nothing, to be sure, can justify the wilful use of such weapons as Uranium Warheads, the radioactivity of which will be suffered by many generations to come.

Based in London, UK, Friends of Lebanon has been created to provide a worldwide community to celebrate and support Lebanon. We would like not only to help rebuild Lebanon, but also to provide the education and understanding needed to prevent the reoccurrence of such mindless acts of violence. Together we can and will build a better and more peaceful Lebanon.

Click Here To Read the Friends of Lebanon Constitution